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Meet Our Author: Kay C. Sulli

Howdy! I’m Kay C. Sulli and I currently live in southern California. However, I’m a bit of a rolling stone. I grew up and spent most of my life in Colorado in the shadows of the Rocky Mountains, then gallivanted in Wyoming for about three years, briefly worked for the Mouse in Florida, and spent some time in some pretty iconic places of northern California.

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Meet Our Author: Shira Glassman

I’m Shira Glassman and I live in north central Florida. Florida is a huge state and not all of it is coconut palms, crowded beaches, and theme parks. If you go far enough north, you get to sprawling oak trees with scraggly gray Spanish moss dripping from their branches, and just about an hour into that area is where I live. Gainesville is a university town full of progressives, hippies, and sports fans. I grew up in the coconut palm area, though.

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Meet Our Author: Sacha Lamb

My name is Sacha Lamb, and I live in New England, USA. With occasional interludes in central Florida.

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Transgender Day of Visibility—Celebrating Diversity in Trans Identities

To the transgender community there are two important international days of recognition. The first, Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) on November 20, is a day to remember and mourn the violence experienced by the transgender community. The second, the Transgender Day of Visibility (TDOV), today on March 31, is all about making the trans community more visible in society.

Transgender is a huge umbrella term to a lot of different people. For a long time, I considered transgender (trans) and non-binary (enby) as two very different identities. Now, however, my opinions on that have been changing. There is more diversity to trans identities than I used to think.

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Trans voices in mainstream publishing—give us bread, but give us roses

We are facing serious upheaval and turbulent political times, and yet we can’t forget art. We can’t give up novels, poetry, paintings, music, and media, even in the most challenging of eras. 

During the early years of the labor movements in the United States, circa 1911, suffragist Rose Schneiderman wrote:

“What the woman who labors wants is the right to live, not simply exist—the right to life as the rich woman has the right to life, and the sun and music and art. You have nothing that the humblest worker has not a right to have also. The worker must have bread, but she must have roses, too.

It became a slogan—Bread and Roses—that still applies today. In today’s context, our bread is essential gains like civil rights protections, housing and social support programs, trans-supportive health care, living wages, etc; while our roses are books, television, movies, music, and art. Specifically, art created by trans people.